Navojo Rug Cleaning – Taking Care of Your Piece of American History!

You may be lucky to have inherited an exceptional Navajo rug, but you may not be sure if it's indeed a Navajo, or perhaps you are looking for some place specialized in repairing or cleaning such fine products. A Navajo rug is a flat woven rug made from woolen yarn with a cotton / woolen…

You may be lucky to have inherited an exceptional Navajo rug, but you may not be sure if it's indeed a Navajo, or perhaps you are looking for some place specialized in repairing or cleaning such fine products.

A Navajo rug is a flat woven rug made from woolen yarn with a cotton / woolen base. The patterns look simple, but they are complex at the same time. Depending on its age, a Navajo could have been very fragile, needing very careful handling.

The history of Navajo rugs can be traced back to the beginning of the nineteenth century. But for the quality of workmanship and selection of material, Navajos would have failed to stand the tests of time. Subsequent to Word War II, these rugs became known by the area where they got woven. The same trend continues till date. The colors used for its making and its pattern vary with the region of its weaving. For instance, Crystals got woven on the Crystal trading post, while Two Gray Hills acquired their name from the Two Gray Hills County, where they got woven. From TeecNosPos to Chief Blankets, they all possess different patterns and colors.

Over the last few years, the prices of Navajo rugs have gone up, as their popularity has been growing day-by-day. Although the price of a Navajo rug is not quoted on a square foot basis, you can expect to discover prices of over $ 200 per square foot. Collectors all over the world are really keen to procure these rugs at very fancy prices. Some of these rugs are being made these days too, but you'll find most of them, dating to the late 1800s to early 1940s, contained in museums or in the possession of antique collectors.

Repairing or washing a Navajo rug is a highly specialized job. Similarly, the places where these were woven lacked a sufficient quantity of water needed for rinsing the dye used for making them. That is the most common reason causing these rugs to “bleed” when getting washed. It is also known that, sometimes, dry cleaning too can cause the colors to bleed, particularly red. Most cleaners reply to undertake the cleaning of such rugs due to the lack of experience. So, you need to be very careful while selecting a cleaner for your Navajo. Look for experienced and knowledgeable cleaners. Washing and cleaning of these rugs is indeed a very challenging job. For its appropriate cleaning, the cleaners should have mastered the technique of preventing their bleeding during the course of washing, or to identify and eliminate the very cause of that before proceeding with its cleaning.